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NERC Blog

The Lives of Recyclables

This guest blog is courtesy of RoadRunner Recycling. The post was written by Shelby Bell at RoadRunner Recycling.

Have you ever wondered what happens to your materials after they have been tossed in the recycling bin? After collection, each material is set on its own path to become a new product. Some materials can cycle through the process indefinitely, while others can only be recycled a few times before they lose their quality. Continue reading to learn about the recyclables’ journey from the recycling bin back to the shelf.

Cardboard

Did you know, 1 ton of recycled cardboard saves 46 gallons of oil and over 9 cubic yards of landfill space? Cardboard fibers are strong and can break down many times before they lose their quality. Once cardboard travels from your recycling…

Verifying Sustainability at Meaningful Scale: The Landscape Approach

This guest blog is courtesy of GreenBlue and was written by Sarah Crow, Senior Director, Sustainability Solutions, American Forest Foundation

As 2020 approaches, many brand owners and retailers are evaluating their performance and analyzing how they can achieve their sustainability goals for this decade. At the 2018 SPC Advance conference, hosted by The Sustainable Packaging Coalition, sustainability leaders from many different companies discussed the opportunities to demonstrate sustainability and make a difference through their sourcing.

Many companies have set goals to source 100% of the fiber for their packaging, paper, and other materials from recycled, certified, and verified sources. These brands want greater visibility into their sourcing and a means to drive sustainability at scale.

“Mars is excited to be a partner in the development of Forests in Focus. We believe Forests in Focus will enable a deeper assessment of our fiber…

How Much of our Waste is Actually Recyclable?

Environmental Research & Education Foundation.

Check out the infographic!

Since 1995, the amount of commodity recyclables in the waste stream has fallen 10 points from 53% to 43%.

A recent EREF analysis examined the waste management policies set by state/local agencies, such as recycling and diversion goals. EREF found that states across the U.S. have recycling goals ranging from 10% – 50%.

If every item that was capable of being recycled actually was recycled, could these goals be achieved? This concept, applicable to diversion in general, is known as the theoretical maximum recovery.

Disclaimer: Guest blogs represent the opinion of the writers and may not reflect the policy or position of the Northeast Recycling Council, Inc.

“Recomposition”: Composting Meets the Death Industry

Here in NERC’s hometown of Brattleboro, Vermont, the local waste hauler collects household food scraps once a week, and delivers them for rendering into compost at our solid waste management district. It’s a trend that’s catching on in many places, and for many reasons; not the least of which are the benefits to soil health that compost brings.

Meanwhile, on farms and ranches, composting on a much larger scale occurs as a station in the cycle of life. When done properly, the composting of animal mortalities is an effective way of dealing with animal carcasses while providing beneficial soil amendments.

For a number of reasons, little thought has traditionally been given to the composting of human remains. But in the State of Washington, that may soon change. State Senator Jamie Pederson has introduced…

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